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The Registry of Nature Habitats
PO Box 321
Meridale, NY 13806

Copyright 1999 - All Rights Reserved

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Conservation Credits | Carbon Emission Credits | Woodland Planting Credits
Wetland Planting Credits | Meadow Seeding Credits | Tree Planting Credits
Puddle Pond Credits | Bluebird Trail Credits | Fish Stocking Credits
Farmer & Landowner Agreements

Puddle Pond Credits

A puddle pond is a small pond that has heavy vegetation, with extensive buffer strips. Generally shallow (<3 feet) with an irregular, gentle sloping shoreline.


Puddle Ponds


Wildlife water holes are an important habitat component for a variety of wildlife. They provide drinking water for many species including bats, wild turkeys and white-tailed deer and also serve as breeding habitat for many amphibians. Water holes come in a variety of shapes, sizes and locations. A wildlife water hole may be a naturally occurring ridgetop pond, a depression in a field or even a road-rut on an abandoned logging road. Just as is the case with other habitat components, different types of wildlife benefit from different types of water holes. Some pond breeding amphibians (a variety of frogs, toads, and salamanders) select ephemeral water holes that dry up for at least part of the year because these ponds do not contain fish and other predators that eat amphibian eggs and young. Others seem to do well in permanent water holes that are needed for drinking water sources.

Existing wetlands are usually self-sustaining ecosystems which provide fish and wildlife habitat, flood, water quality and shoreline protection as well as aesthetics and recreational opportunities. These systems should not be disturbed or altered to create deep water ponds for fishing or stormwater detention. Wildlife ponds can be constructed in an upland area that is adjacent to existing wetlands to avoid impacting these fragile ecosystems. Occasionally, wildlife ponds that are shallow (less than 5 feet deep) and gentle sloping (less than 1:8 slide slopes) may be built in lower quality wetlands where the construction will enhance the water quality and wildlife values of the wetland.

Waterfowl and other wildlife may be attracted to ponds
which have an ample food supply and enough surrounding
vegetation to provide some protection. Puddle ducks, such as
mallards and blackducks, prefer shallow waters for feeding.
Areas with water between 6 inches and three feet deep are
needed to grow the aquatic plants that wild birds need.
Aquatic plants should have a 50:50 ratio to open water for
optimal waterfowl habitat. Specific plants, such as burreeds,
wild rice, arrowhead and sago pondweed, are desirable for
attracting certain species of wildlife.
Waterfowl and other wildlife may be attracted to ponds which have an ample food supply and enough surrounding vegetation to provide some protection. Puddle ducks, such as mallards and blackducks, prefer shallow waters for feeding. Areas with water between 6 inches and three feet deep areneeded to grow the aquatic plants that wild birds need. Aquatic plants should have a 50:50 ratio to open water for optimal waterfowl habitat. Specific plants, such as burreeds, wild rice, arrowhead and sago pondweed, are desirable for attracting certain species of wildlife.

Buffer habitat (e.g. ground nesting birds/waterfowl) and maintenance of the ability of the wetland/pond to remain healthy. If the perimeter is only partly protected, contaminated surface flows may enter directly through any gaps. Land use practices (tillage, application of nutrients, pesticides etc.) on lands adjacent to wetlands and ponds also have a critical role to play in determining the water quality. A buffer strip  an be effective in filtering out sediments and other contaminants carried in runoff before they reach a wetland or wildlife pond. Surface water quality can also have an impact on quality.

Exploitative or destructive use (poor stewardship) of a wetland will limit its benefits and could cause permanent damage. Wisely managed, the resources of a wetland

How Puddle Pond Credits Are Used

When you purchase a Meadow Planting Credit, you are investing into your and your children's future. The money is used to assist farmers and landowners to plan, restore and impliment a Meadow Planting project. The benefits are numerous and the return on investment is priceless.




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The Registry of Nature Habitats
PO Box 321
Meridale, NY 13806
Copyright 1999 - All Rights Reserved

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