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Wetland Basics | Ponds | Streams | Bogs & Fens
Marshes | Pollution  | Wetlands

Marshes 
In geography, a marsh is a type of wetland, featuring grasses, rushes, reeds, typhas, sedges, cat tails, and other herbaceous plants (possibly with low-growing woody plants) in a context of shallow water. A marsh is different from a swamp, which is dominated by trees rather than grasses and low herbs. The water of a marsh can be fresh, brackish or saline. Coastal marshes may be associated with estuaries and along waterways between coastal barrier islands and the inner coast. Estuarine marshes often are based on soils consisting of sandy bottoms or bay muds.

The shallow-water marsh provides feeding grounds for "wading" birds such as cranes and egrets. The marshland is "ephemeral", meaning that the water supply is dependant upon seasonal periods of precipitation and run-off. In our desert climate, there are times during the year that the marsh area may be completely dry.




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    The Registry of Nature Habitats
    PO Box 321
    Meridale, NY 13806
    Copyright 1999 - All Rights Reserved

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